Phoenix Rising (in form of new studio)

Some of you may recall that I lost my art studio to an electrical fire back in December. :(  The smoke damage was worse than the fire itself!

fire 1

Fast forward a few months, and things have turned around. I’ve found a new studio space that will double as a small gallery for my work. It will take months of remodeling to make this happen, but I’m excited to get going. Just south of Rockhurst University and UMKC, I’m joining a mini-enclave of artists who are trying to bring more arts to the local community. Studio RM Gardner is located at: 1017 E. 55th St. Kansas City, MO 64110

before pic

Before Pic (I’d love to show the after, but it’s going to take a while).

If you’re in the KC area, I will be open for Second Fridays (6-9pm) throughout the construction.  And yes, I am working there in the meantime. Here are some detail shots of the textile quilt collage (Quillage anyone?) work I’ve been doing in the last few months.

text inter 1Detail text inter 2Detail text inter 3

 

Fiberart International 2013

Ok, so waaaay behind on blogging. That is just  how this ball of wax rolls.

Back in April, I traveled to Pittsburgh, PA for the opening reception and weekend forum for Fiberart International 2013. It. Was. Wonderful.

It was an utterly packed weekend, but it was wonderful to meet so many talented artists.


Standing next to one of two works selected for the show, Revealing Cracks Mandala   Roslyn Ritter – Love Letters This is her mother’s wedding dress, handstitched with text from her father’s love letters to her mother. Gorgeous.

Sandra Jane Heard - Vestiges of Emancipation  One of my favorite works at the show, this stunning work is constructed from vintage tape measures.


Love the depth of detail and the richness of color Susan Hotchkis creates in Once.

 
Isovel Blank – B-Side : Odd to be sure, but that is why I love it.

Some of us were asked to send a selection of process-based resource and materials from our studio practice. I sent a variety of tests, texture samples, and various little things I keep in my visual periphery. That’s also my work, Unable to Divide, to the right.

From here, I’d like to send you to Lizz Aston’s blog. She has two pieces in the show, won an award for her work, and wrote a wonderfully thorough post of the show. No sense in recreating the wheel. You can also view the entire catalog online.

Escape to Create Residency #1 – Falling in Love with Paper

January found me in mostly sunny Florida, in the community that spawned the architectural genre of “New Urbanism” and in the presence of beaches that can compete with any in the world (really). However, I was not on vacation. I was there to work and research and develop and yes, okay, then take a walk along the beach to mull things over. I was taking part in my first artist residency at Escape to Create in Seaside, Florida.

My residency project was founded on the research and development of casting lace techniques that I had begun in the summer at the Anderson Ranch Arts Center in Colorado. My research began not in fabric, but in paper. Working towards complex forms, I started from the beginning, learning how to fold lengths, widths and any angle into equal divisions without measuring or marking. This image is from the first week.

The table eventually became so layered with mounds of folded paper to the point it became hard to find what I was looking for!

I also worked with exercises to design folded structures using the principles of symmetry. Here is an early and simple example of linear reflection symmetry.

And here are samples using rotational symmetry and their inverted forms.

And then came the more complicated glide reflection, which can result in what I like to call “the sexy paper.” Oh yeah.


Super fun and flexible, but not necessarily something achievable in the type of lace I make currently. Something to think about though…

If you are interested in paper folding forms, I basically used Folding Techniques for Designers – From Sheet to Form by artist and teacher Paul Jackson like a textbook. It looks like he’s coming out with a new publication this month as well! Paul Jackson was also one of the featured origami artists in Between the Folds (available on Netflix), a beautiful and fascinating documentary on paper folding. Watch it. I promise you, you will not be disappointed. I’ve watched it multiple times. Really, I could go on and on, but I’ll stop there!

In the next post, I’ll share some my first attempts of casting lace fabric at the residency. Oh, and after our blizzards here in the Midwest, you can sure bet I miss that Florida weather (not to mention the great folks I met down there)!

Wait, Rewind! Artist Interview for The Frontier Project

Earlier this year, I participated in an email interview as part of a project for The Frontier, one of many mini-projects for the 15 year anniversary project for The Charolotte Street Foundation, one of KC’s powerhouse arts organizations. The multi-faceted celebration considered the history and future of artist-driven pioneering in Kansas City and the changing nature of the city’s “frontiers” by asking artists to submit all kinds of projects. One project selected, Frontier: Momentum and Trajectory, was a retrospective of artists who had been through the Urban Culture Project (UCP) studio residency program.

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But after my interview, I didn’t hear anything. I looked a few times on the website, but didn’t see anything. I apparently didn’t look well enough and totally missed it!

While my residency was a few years ago, I looked at it from the perspective of how it informs my work today.  Here’s the interview.

Here’s the project, Frontier: Momentum and Trajectorywith video slideshow and more artist interviews.

Better late than never. Enjoy.

Shining the Spotlight – Work Featured in Online Magazine

Hot off the e-presses, I am happy to share this online magazine titled Progress…

My work is featured on pages 5, 16, & 17. Also included is work by artist Amanda Kiesling, a feature article on Ayla Rexroth’s Subterranean Gallery, and a brief history of Pitch Magazine, a KC staple for local arts and culture.

View Progress… Magazine

Sbmt2Prgrss

I enjoyed the call for submissions image, because, well, resistance is futile…

Enjoy.

Showing the Goods: The Kauffman Lecture

The day before the election, I was giving my own version of a stump speech, detailing my origins as an artist, from my early to present work, and touched on my upcoming projects.

Photo Muchos thanks to fellow artist and Inspiration Grant winner Angelica Sandoval for letting me use the awesome Kickstarter Shout-Out she made for me as the title slide of my presentation (Her Kickster was successful too! You can see her installation now in the windows of BNIM in downtown KC). Sooo much better than plain ol’ text. I love it.


I was able to cover my early work, including this piece In the Eye of the Beholder.


Of course, I went over the process of making my current work and my studies at the Anderson Ranch Arts Center.


I aim to please, so I also brought finished work as well as many random samples and experiments from the studio.

Thanks to Leslie at the Kauffman Foundation for hosting me and to the Metro Arts Council for running the Now Showing Program! I enjoy sharing my work and hope to do so again. Yay for public speaking!

The Fresh Goods: New Cast Lace Work

Putting my Anderson Ranch Studies to the test, I have been busy making the first new lace works and I want to share them with you! These are the first mid-sized works on the way to working larger in scale.

These works use three main techniques. This first vessel uses what I call gravity casting, which allows for free form shaping.

Gravity Vessel #1
12 x 10.75 x 7.75″

In the Memory Records below, I cast resin in a highly detailed mold, which was made at Anderson Ranch. Learning a technique used by my teacher, Lynn Richardson, I carefully remove the piece before it has finished curing, allowing it to deviate from its initially flat existence (I do leave some flat though). While from the same mold, no one piece is exactly alike.

each 8 x 8 x variable depth (1/8 – 1 7/8″)

For an installation, they would hang in concert, but be available individually. This is the one examples where physical lace or thread is not used, but represented as subject matter.

For the following works, I’m working with two casting techniques. The lace is initially cast over a form and then I use gravity casting to build additional layers and texture. Mm, mm, MMM. I do love texture.

Pillar of… (#1)
23.5 x 6.5 x 2.5″
  

Pillar of… (#2)
24 x 6.5 x 2.5″
  

Parabolic Triptych
each approx 11 3/4 x 11 7/8 x 3/8″; overall 11 3/4 x 40 x 2 1/2″